• Crisis briefing
  • 12 October 2016

Niger, Rift Valley Fever

On 12 October 2016 we responded to a funding alert for Niger, raised in response to a Rift Valley fever outbreak in the Tahoua region.

Rift Valley fever is an acute viral disease most commonly observed in domesticated animals; it has the ability to infect and cause illness in humans. By 22 September, the World Health Organisation (WHO) had announced 64 human cases of Rift Valley fever, including 23 deaths, in the Tchintabaraden health district. The statement explained the risk of a further spread of the outbreak – both within Niger and internationally – as a result of the nomadic nature of stockbreeders, who migrate to other sub-Saharan countries and irrigation systems along the river Niger.

According to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)’s Financial Tracking Service (FTS), donors have committed/contributed US$161 million of humanitarian assistance to Niger since the beginning of 2016. As of 11 October, only US$11,500 has been reported in response to the outbreak in Niger.

The UN coordinated appeal for Niger requests US$260 million, it is currently 44% funded at US$116 million.

Read our full analysis of the current funding situation.

Download the data as Excel or OpenDocument.

GHA AND THE START NETWORK

The GHA Programme is partnering with the START network to help to inform its funding allocation decisions. The START network is a consortium of British-based humanitarian INGOs, which has recently launched its own fund to help fill funding gaps and enable rapid response to under-reported crises where need is great.

When the START members issue a funding alert, we produce (within 12 hours) a rapid overview of the humanitarian funding picture – recent funding, an overview of appeals and funds, and analysis of donor trends. The analysis is targeted not only at the START network but also to a wider set of stakeholders engaged in these crises – including donors, humanitarian organisations, analysts, advocates and citizens.

Photo: Sylvain Liechti/MINUSMA