Brazil’s growing development cooperation focuses on neighbouring countries

by Mariella Di Ciommo


Development cooperation from Brazil goes mainly to neighbours

Brazil’s development cooperation reached US$1 billion in 2010, with two thirds going to Latin American countries and one quarter to sub-Saharan Africa. Poverty levels do not appear to drive Brazil’s resource allocation decisions.

Between 2009 and 2010, Brazil’s development cooperation increased by 74% to reach US$1 billion. The largest component of Brazil’s support is for peacekeeping operations, which grew by four times over the same period to reach US$377 million. Funding of international bodies was the second largest category, at US$353 million.

Brazil was engaged in development cooperation with 124 countries. Of these recipients, 31 are classed as upper income countries, with relatively high average gross national incomes. However, amounts to these countries were low (US$10 million out of US$184 million in 2010). Latin America received most of Brazil’s contributions to countries (68%), with 23% going to sub-Saharan Africa.

The available data suggest that poverty is not a key driver for allocations. Some 43% of Brazil`s country cooperation went to Haiti, where extreme poverty is high (62% of people live on less than PPP$1.25 a day). But relatively large levels of support go to partner countries with relatively low levels of extreme poverty, such as Chile and Argentina (both with extreme poverty levels of around 1%).

International solidarity and fostering of socio-economic development are seen as the basis for development cooperation. Poverty is not an explicit objective.*

Better information would help to more clearly assess the impact of Brazil’s development cooperation on poverty. Brazil has made progress on transparency, publishing two official reports with useful information, and committed to publish these annually. But further steps will be needed to analyse how Brazil’s development cooperation can help those most in need.

Data are available in Excel and CSV format.

Notes: 

Gross disbursements of development cooperation, 2000-2010, in constant 2011 prices.
Based on Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada (IPEA), Cooperação Brasileira para o Desenvolvimento Internacional (Brazil’s Cooperation for International Development), 2010 and 2013.
* Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada (IPEA), Cooperação Brasileira para o Desenvolvimento Internacional (Brazil’s Cooperation for International Development), 2013.
For details on methodology and sources see report.

Source:

Development Initiatives, Development Cooperation for the Future (April 2014).